• Issue
    Volume 11, Issue 10
    i, 1477-1580
    October 2019

COVER PICTURE

Free Access

Cover Picture

  • Pages: i
  • First Published: 16 October 2019
Description unavailable

ISSUE INFORMATION

Free Access

Issue Information

  • Pages: 1477-1479
  • First Published: 16 October 2019

RESEARCH ARTICLES

Identification of a thermal degradation product of CUMYL-PEGACLONE and its detection in biological samples

  • Pages: 1480-1485
  • First Published: 03 September 2019
Description unavailable

Investigation into the thermal stability of CUMYL-PEGACLONE with the identification of a major thermal degradation product, N-penyl-γ- carbolinone.

Open Access

Detection of Δ9 THC in oral fluid following vaporized cannabis with varied cannabidiol (CBD) content: An evaluation of two point-of-collection testing devices

  • Pages: 1486-1497
  • First Published: 23 August 2019
Description unavailable

The ongoing legalization of medical and recreational cannabis presents new challenges for law enforcement and traffic safety regulations. Here, oral fluid THC and CBD concentrations were quantified via LC–MS/MS and the performance of two point-of-collection testing (POCT) devices was assessed following controlled vaporization of cannabis with varied CBD content. POCT can detect very recent cannabis use, but there are concerns around reliability and accuracy when these devices are used in real-world settings.

Open Access

Detectability of various cannabinoids in plasma samples of cannabis users: Indicators of recent cannabis use?

  • Pages: 1498-1506
  • First Published: 12 August 2019
Description unavailable

To assess the informative value of determining (minor) cannabinoids in plasma of cannabis users, detection rates of 14 cannabinoids (next to Δ9-THC and THC-COOH) were determined. 11-OH-THC, THCA, CBC, CBN, and CBD were the most frequent detectable cannabinoids. The dependency of cannabinoid detectability on the plasma Δ9-THC concentration was examined

Open Access

Phenethylamine-derived new psychoactive substances 2C-E-FLY, 2C-EF-FLY, and 2C-T-7-FLY: Investigations on their metabolic fate including isoenzyme activities and their toxicological detectability in urine screenings

  • Pages: 1507-1521
  • First Published: 12 July 2019
Description unavailable

In total, 32 metabolites were tentatively identified in rat urine or in vitro incubations with human liver S9 fraction. Main metabolic steps were hydroxylation and N-acetylation catalyzed by CYP2D6, CYP3A4, NAT1, and NAT2. The standard urine screening approaches by GC-MS, LC-MSn, and LC-HRMS/MS were suitable to detect an intake of these NPS.

Distribution pattern of common drugs of abuse, ethyl glucuronide, and benzodiazepines in hair across the scalp

  • Pages: 1522-1541
  • First Published: 12 August 2019
Description unavailable

Hair concentration distribution patterns of ethyl glucuronide, cocaine, and other forensically important substances across the scalp were characterized via a sampling of all head hair as individual locks for 14 people who consumed cocaine and alcohol. Variation of skin perfusion rates and sweating rates across the head were investigated to rationalize the observed differences. Large concentration differences were observed, with cocaine showing higher concentrations on the periphery and ethyl glucuronide higher concentrations at the vertex.

A systematic investigation of forensic hair decontamination procedures and their limitations

  • Pages: 1542-1555
  • First Published: 12 August 2019
Description unavailable

A systematic investigation of hair decontamination procedures adhering to Society of Hair Testing recommendations failed to remove external cocaine and methamphetamine contamination. As such, preparative solvent washing in forensic hair analysis should focus on maximizing the recovery and detectability of metabolites.

Multivariate interpretation of the urinary steroid profile and training-induced modifications. The case study of a Marathon runner

  • Pages: 1556-1565
  • First Published: 15 July 2019
Description unavailable

The urinary steroid profile of an amateur marathon runner was determined in 198 samples collected during three months of training under varying conditions. The data were interpreted by multivariate statistics revealing that intense training produces a substantial increase of the urinary steroids' level for up to 6−8 hours, but does not modify significantly their concentration ratios. Testosterone, epitestosterone, and 5α-adiol are the steroids most susceptible of varying upon intense training.

Detection of testosterone doping in female athletes

  • Pages: 1566-1571
  • First Published: 27 August 2019
Description unavailable

Urine T/E ratio can screen for testosterone (T) doping in men but the underlying physiological mechanism is inoperative in females, so different testing is required. We report two female athletes whose T doping was proven by serum T measurement by liquid chromatography−mass spectrometry (LS−MS) when serial urine T/E ratios were not indicative. This shows the potential for serum T measurement by LC-MS to detect T doping in female athletes, especially if implemented in a Bayesian athlete biological passport format.

Open Access

Toxicokinetics and analytical toxicology of the abused opioid U-48800 — in vitro metabolism, metabolic stability, isozyme mapping, and plasma protein binding

  • Pages: 1572-1580
  • First Published: 19 August 2019
Description unavailable

In total, 13 phase I and one phase II metabolites were tentatively identified. Main metabolic reactions were N-dealkylation and hydroxylation, catalyzed by CYP2C19 and CYP3A4. In vitro half-life and intrinsic clearance could be rated as moderate compared to other new synthetic opioids.