Volume 30, Issue 7 e3723
RESEARCH ARTICLE

Combined spiroergometry and 31P–MRS of human calf muscle during high-intensity exercise

K. Moll

Corresponding Author

K. Moll

Medical Physics Group, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Jena University Hospital, Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Jena, Germany

Correspondence

K. Moll, Medical Physics Group, Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Center of Radiology, Jena University Hospital, Friedrich Schiller University Jena, ‘MRT am Steiger’, Philosophenweg 3, 07743, Jena, Germany.

Email: [email protected]

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A. Gussew

A. Gussew

Medical Physics Group, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Jena University Hospital, Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Jena, Germany

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C. Hein

C. Hein

Ganshorn Medizin Electronic GmbH, Niederlauer, Germany

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N. Stutzig

N. Stutzig

Exercise Science, Institute of Sport and Movement Science, University of Stuttgart, Stuttgart, Germany

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J.R. Reichenbach

J.R. Reichenbach

Medical Physics Group, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Jena University Hospital, Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Jena, Germany

Michael Stifel Center for Data-Driven and Simulation Science Jena, Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Jena, Germany

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First published: 24 March 2017
Citations: 4

Abstract

Simultaneous measurements of pulmonary oxygen consumption (VO2), carbon dioxide exhalation (VCO2) and phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P–MRS) are valuable in physiological studies to evaluate muscle metabolism during specific loads. Therefore, the aim of this study was to adapt a commercially available spirometric device to enable measurements of VO2 and VCO2 whilst simultaneously performing 31P–MRS at 3 T. Volunteers performed intense plantar flexion of their right calf muscle inside the MR scanner against a pneumatic MR-compatible pedal ergometer. The use of a non-magnetic pneumotachograph and extension of the sampling line from 3 m to 5 m to place the spirometric device outside the MR scanner room did not affect adversely the measurements of VO2 and VCO2. Response and delay times increased, on average, by at most 0.05 s and 0.79 s, respectively. Overall, we were able to demonstrate a feasible ventilation response (VO2 = 1.05 ± 0.31 L/min; VCO2 = 1.11 ± 0.33 L/min) during the exercise of a single calf muscle, as well as a good correlation between local energy metabolism and muscular acidification (τPCr fast and pH; R2 = 0.73, p < 0.005) and global respiration (τPCr fast and VO2; R2 = 0.55, p = 0.01). This provides improved insights into aerobic and anaerobic energy supply during strong muscular performances.