Volume 82, Issue 5 p. 558-563
RESEARCH ARTICLE

Dentine tubule disinfection by different irrigation protocols

Ana Morago

Ana Morago

Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Granada, Granada, Spain

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Matilde Ruiz-Linares

Corresponding Author

Matilde Ruiz-Linares

Department of Stomatology, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Granada, Granada, Spain

Correspondence

Matilde Ruiz Linares, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Granada, Campus Cartuja s/n, Colegio Máximo 18071, Granada, Spain.

Email: [email protected]

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Carmen María Ferrer-Luque

Carmen María Ferrer-Luque

Department of Stomatology, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Granada, Granada, Spain

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Pilar Baca

Pilar Baca

Department of Stomatology, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Granada, Granada, Spain

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Alberto Rodríguez Archilla

Alberto Rodríguez Archilla

Department of Stomatology, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Granada, Granada, Spain

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María Teresa Arias-Moliz

María Teresa Arias-Moliz

Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Granada, Granada, Spain

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First published: 05 January 2019
Citations: 15
Review Editor: Paul Verkade

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to test the antimicrobial activity and the smear layer removal of different irrigation protocols—sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), NaOCl followed by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), and NaOCl combined with etidronic acid (HEBP)—against infected dentine tubules during root canal preparation. Single rooted premolars contaminated with Enterococcus faecalis were chemomechanically prepared. Depending on the irrigation protocols, the roots were divided into the following groups: (1) distilled water during and after instrumentation; (2) 2.5% NaOCl during and after instrumentation; (3) 2.5% NaOCl/9% HEBP during and after instrumentation; and (4) 2.5% NaOCl during instrumentation followed by 17% EDTA after instrumentation. The percentage of dead cells and the biovolume in infected dentine tubules were measured using confocal laser scanning microscopy and the live/dead technique. Smear layer removal on root canal wall surfaces was observed by means of scanning electron microscopy. Results were compared through parametric tests (p < .05). The groups NaOCl, NaOCl/HEBP, and NaOCl+EDTA exerted the highest antimicrobial activity (p > .05), followed by the group irrigated with water. All the irrigation protocols—including water—significantly reduced the bacteria biovolume. No dentine tubules free of smear layer were found in the positive control or the 2.5% NaOCl group. With NaOCl/HEBP and NaOCl+EDTA, respectively, 90.41% ± 7.33 and 76.54% ± 15.30 of dentine tubules were free of smear layer (p = .01). NaOCl/HEBP and NaOCl+EDTA exerted an important antimicrobial activity against bacteria inside dentine tubules, lowering the bacteria biovolume and eliminating a high amount of the smear layer, particularly in the NaOCl/HEBP group.

CONFLICT OF INTEREST

The authors have nothing to disclose and have no conflict of interest to declare.